The Courier’s vintage printing kit earning headlines all over again on Tom Allen’s new Channel 4 demonstrate

A battered classic printer’s cupboard and its primary brass typefaces – after made use of to print countless numbers of copies of The Courier – has been lovingly restored in a new Channel 4 show.

The transformation of the piece of kit, which for a long time noticed day-to-day services in a Stonehaven printers’ workshop, is the star of tonight’s Mend It For Income, a new sequence which blends Dragon’s Den with The Fix Shed.

Both Jimmy Bruce, the printer who made use of it for a lot more than 30 a long time, and Murray Aitken, the Stonehaven upscaler who salvaged it, are delighted to see the previous workhorse provided a new lease of daily life in the clearly show, narrated by comedy star Tom Allen.

The classic printer’s cupboard was in use each and every day for decades.

The intriguing product – which Murray acquired far more than a year ago – commenced everyday living with The Courier, explained Jimmy, who retired in 2019 at the age of 84, having operate James A Bruce Printers on Cameron Street for 55 several years.

“It was when they improved about to a new computerised program, I stripped their Intertype (typesetting machine) down there and rebuilt it in Cameron Road,” he mentioned. “That cabinet contained mattresses, the brass letters that were utilized for making moulds to solid the lead letters for type.

Jimmy had a enthusiasm for his occupation

“They have been the letters utilized in headlines and items like that. It was just about 10 years old when I bought it 30 or so decades ago, but all those letters will have printed a honest number of thousand copies of The Courier.”

Murray, who just lately started out in business recycling and upscaling uncommon goods as bespoke home furnishings and artwork, stated he had been wanting for a pair of printers’ trays to convert into exhibit circumstances and frequented Jimmy’s store.

The brass letters held in the cabinet’s drawers.

“It was pure likelihood I caught him on the suitable working day, he was standing in the window holding two printers’ trays, which was accurately what I needed. Jimmy and his son were in there clearing the place out,” stated Murray, who is also a photographer.

“I observed it quite a privilege to get a maintain of these merchandise which I knew would be incredibly sought just after, so I supplied him some funds which was far better than him throwing them in the bin and acquired a lot of his inventory.

“And Jimmy is an definitely fantastic gentleman. He’s a terrific character and you can tell the enthusiasm he had for his job. I visited his premises 3 or four occasions and he would give me a tour and demonstrate me what that issue was and what he used this for.”

Amid the printers’ trays, aged stamps and printers’ blocks was the classic cupboard and its brass letters in a range of fonts.

Murray Aitken has a recycling and upscaling business enterprise and is also a photographer.

Tool which is been labored with

“It had a good bit of wear and tear to it, so I gave it a great cleanse and a light sanding to try out to maintain the search of it. I did not want to make it look model new or consider away from the attraction of it. It experienced some good dress in, it had obtained a few of knocks. It has not been a cherished piece, it’s been a device that has been labored with. Around the yrs it has designed up this beautiful, worn, interesting patina.”

Murray claimed he kept maintain of the case for a when as he “loved it so much” then made the decision to sell it on as he at first planned and set it up for sale on line – when it was spotted by a single of the Mend It For Income scientists.

“Initially I turned down them for the reason that I didn’t think it desired fully restored as that could possibly destroy some of the charm. But just after a little bit of thing to consider I imagined as prolonged as the restorers have an understanding of that and that it does not want to appear like a brand name new piece, I would go with it.”

Tom Allen narrates the Channel 4 present, Mend It For Income.

Murray reported the full expertise of filming Mend It For Cash in Glasgow very last year, underneath Covid distancing restrictions, was interesting. He created a pitch to two specialist restorers. He then experienced to pick which just one to go with, dependent on how a lot they considered the merchandise would fetch at auction and how a lot of a lower they would just take.

Broke it down and cleaned it up

He resolved to go with restorer Nick Zammeti.

“He agreed with me it didn’t will need way too considerably operate. He reported he could it’s possible get £700 or  £800 plus and he would consider 25% of it, but I bartered it down to 20% since he reported it did not require significantly do the job performed on it,” claimed Murray.

Nick has a YouTube channel with extra than 750,000 subscribers and for Murray that was a selecting variable in achieving a widespread viewers and hopefully securing a fantastic price tag.

Mend It For Money restorers contain Nick Zammeti, Paul Commander and Sophie Harris.

Murray explained: “Nick broke it all down, cleaned almost everything up and went along with the monotonous job of polishing all the specific brass lettering. I was delighted.”

However, the merchandise didn’t truly obtain a buyer at the conclusion of the day and is still available on eBay, claimed Murray.

Murray stated he was incredibly considerably on the lookout forward to watching the clearly show.

“I loved the total practical experience, it’s not typically you get the likelihood to look on a Channel 4 demonstrate and I imagined it would be a chance to kick start off my identify and in the area neighborhood men and women may well acquire notice of what I’m carrying out.”

https://www.youtube.com/view?v=eE5g8_0UDcY

Jimmy was also on the lookout ahead to observing his outdated piece of machines in the countrywide spotlight.

Printer to royalty

He claimed he used the cupboard every single day over the many years as he satisfied the printing needs of Stonehaven and the wider group in what was the oldest impartial enterprise in the town.

“It observed a honest bit of use, but it was just a circumstance of sliding out the drawers and using the letters from it, then casting them in the equipment and putting them again.”

“I was accomplishing all the things and everything,” reported Jimmy. “I was undertaking letterheads, newsletters, compliment slips, small business printing and publications for the church buildings and so on. Just about anything that necessary printing in Stonehaven, I would do it.”

The old Intertype equipment that Jimmy Bruce worked on for decades.

Thought of an antique now, his now-well known scenario and its fonts offer you a intriguing insight into the history of printing – and even the origin of referring to letters as currently being upper situation or reduced circumstance.

Jimmy said: “Originally there ended up sort scenarios and the higher situation held all the capitals and figures.”

Jimmy cherished his time as a printer and had some memorable jobs in his time… such as printing for royalty.

Dwindling need in digital age

“I did some stuff for The Queen when she was at Balmoral Castle, by way of trade do the job with a company in Aberdeen. It was invites and letterheads and so on for The Queen. Even though the vintage scenario wasn’t employed for that,” he said.

One particular of the bedrocks of Jimmy’s business was printing fish tallies – the slips that discover corporations and boats for packing containers of fish bought at auction – for markets from Shetland to Cornwall as properly as Northern Eire.

Jimmy’s store was a fixture on Stonehaven’s Cameron Road.

Jimmy mentioned he sooner or later determined to retire as the digital age observed demand from customers for his expert services dwindle.

“With almost everything on pc, men and women ended up undertaking letterheads and matters like that for by themselves, so I acquired out while it was good,” he claimed.

Mend It For Funds is now accessible on All 4, the on-desire company from Channel 4.